Tag Archives: covered jar

A Square Canister from the Potter’s Wheel

19 May

Well, not completely square, it’s true, but square enough to give it some style and to allow it to sit up nice and cozy with its brother and sister canisters. It doesn’t hold quite as much as it could have, if left round, but there are definite advantages to being a square.

At an angle, taken from above.

I order to make the square sides, I paddled the canister with, well, a paddle. You have to do this at just the right stage. If you try too soon, the pot is all wet and sticky and flabby. It doesn’t work well if you wait too long, either, because the clay cracks when you start to form it. Then you have to spend time sticking things back together. I know these things from having done them wrong so many times!

Side one . . . three to go.

It’s hard for me to resist doodling on my pottery, as you can see. I don’t think I like the little dots down on the bottom right, but changing it at this point is not an option :lol:. I get carried away sometimes. This piece was an experiment, so I don’t mind so much that it didn’t turn out perfectly. I’ll most likely keep it for myself, and I can turn this side to the wall!

A bit of a swirl here . . .

Now this side I like. I think I’d like it better if I’d continued the little lines inside the wider swirl the rest of the way around, but it’s not bad if I do say so. That’s the thing about doodling with a pen; you can always add more. Not so much with clay — not after you put it in the kiln, anyway.

Side number three . . .

Now this one is really nice. Well balanced and interesting. It has a focal point and it’s not too busy. I’ll have to remember to keep this in mind for next time. 🙂

This one looks a bit like a bird’s head to me.

The surface here looks a little more matte. In real life, it’s just like the other sides, though. Maybe the sunlight has changed. At any rate, it seems to me to go well with the swirly design next to it. These two sides are my favorites, for sure.

Here are the bottoms.

I like to cut off my pottery from the bat (the surface on top of the potter’s wheel platform) with a ballpoint pen spring stretched between two handles. It gives it a cool pattern, as you see.

And here are the tops.


And finally, the inside of the canister and the top of the lid. Now you know this pot almost as well as I do myself! Maybe I’ll do another one and post some photos of the process in making it.

Blessings, Cindy

Pottery Photos II

5 Oct
I’ve been doing a lot of talking lately about technical stuff. My next post will be on conducting the final glaze firing using an electric kiln, but I thought you might like to see a few photos of finished pottery for a change–get an idea of what you can expect from that glaze kiln (if it turns out well). If you click on the photos, they’ll either take you to my Etsy site (if the piece is for sale) or to my Flickr site (if it’s not).

This jar was wheel thrown and is intended to hold jewelry or
homemade lotion or such. I painted wax resist on the gallery and the
lid ring and fired the lid in place on the pot. If you fire the lid
separately, it will sometimes warp and not fit the pot after glaze
firing, but if you fire the two together, you have to make absolutely
sure there are no traces of glaze anywhere the two pieces will touch.

I first threw this bowl on the wheel, but I didn’t like it. So I
fiddled with it until it looked like this. I really love it now.
This is not to say you should never give up on a pot, but don’t give
up too easily. You never know what you might make of it.

After the first glaze firing, I didn’t like this fellow’s
shiny skin. Sometimes, if you refire a pot to bisque
temperature (just put it in with a bisque load), it will
give the glaze a chance to “devitrify” or form micro-
crystals, matting the glaze. In this case, I was really
happy with the results.

This vase makes me think of something Snow White
or Briar Rose might use for a bouquet of beautiful
wildflowers–hence the name: Forbidden Forest Vase.

And here are the wildflowers themselves. 🙂 I carved them
into this cup. The dark brown unglazed bottom is colored with
an iron oxide wash–that is, an unspecified quantity of
red iron oxide mixed into a bucket of water. If your pieces
come out too dark, mix in some more water. If they’re not brown
enough, add more red iron oxide (RIO). You want maybe a cup or less
to a gallon of water, and you’ll notice that you need to stir it a lot.
My daughter made this little guy, while she was teaching a bunch
of kids to make them, too. I was teaching wheel, so I was glad to have
her taking care of the kids who couldn’t get on the wheel (we have only
four wheels and in this class there were 8 kids). They all made cute
puppies and kittens, but of course, non as cute as my little girl made.

I made this mask during a class teaching, guess what? Masks! I sort of
thought he looked like Pan, so that’s what I called him.

Well, that’s it for now. I’ll try to get back to you with instructions and tips for the glaze firing sometime next week. Then you’ll be all set to go! 😉

Until then, make lots of pottery!

Cindy